Course Information

Instructor: Ann K. D. Myers

Location: Berkeley, California | Bancroft Library

Mode: In-person

Dates: July 15–19, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

aloging of Rare Materials (Books). Emphasis will be placed primarily on books of the hand-press era, with some consideration of 19th and 20th century books in special collections. Topics include:

  • application of codes and standards, especially DCRM(B)
  • transcription, collation, and physical description
  • concepts of edition, impression, issue, state
  • genre/form terms, relationship designators, other special files
  • copy-specific information
  • cataloging policy in institutional contexts, including provisions for anti-racist descriptive practices

This course is intended for working catalogers experienced in AACR2 and/or RDA and MARC 21, and general cataloging principles and practices. No prior knowledge of early books is necessary. The goal of the course is to provide instruction and practice in each of the primary elements of the rare book catalog record, so that students will be equipped to catalog their institution’s rare books and special collections materials to national standards. Please note that this course covers printed monographs only.

Special note on RDA: instruction emphasis is for classic DCRM(B), that is, DCRM(B) as published, which has its basis in AACR2. However, RDA-compliant DCRM(B) will be addressed throughout the course and will be accommodated in classroom exercises. Please also note that although Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Books (RDA Edition), or DCRMR, has been released as a minimum viable product, for the time being, this course will continue to use DCRM(B) as the standard, with reference to differences coming in the future.

Course Information

Instructor: Vanessa Wilkie

Location: Los Angeles

Mode: In-person

Dates: August 5–9, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

This course is designed to teach students the skills to read various English scripts used between 1400 and 1650, with a heavy emphasis on English secretary hand.  No former paleography or non-English language training is necessary.  Participants will gain an introduction to various formats for early modern English manuscripts, like correspondence and indentures, among other forms of documents frequently encountered in archives.  We will also cover the conventions of early modern English currency, dates and calendars, common abbreviations, and numbers.  Each participant will receive a quill, ink, and handmade paper as learning to write with a quill is a quintessential part of learning to read early modern manuscripts.

Course Information

Instructor: Allie Alvis
Location: Los Angeles
Mode: In-person
Dates: August 5–9, 2024
Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

The most common place people encounter book history is not in the library, but through popular media – although “history” is often rather loosely applied to the chimera-like objects created to represent “old” books. Pop Bibliography is the study of the production and reception of bibliography through this media lens. In this course, we will trace the origins of frequently seen physical attributes of depictions of “old” books back to their historic sources, and extrapolate the processes of remediation, context loss, and embellishment that led to the popular concepts of what rare books and manuscripts ought to look like. We will also explore the commercialism at the core of these depictions, engaging with fandom and Bookishness as group markers that companies gain financially from cultivating. The course will wrap up with ideas and conversations about how Pop Bibliography presents new opportunities and challenges for the rare book field, both in terms of working with students and the public and increasing awareness of book history as a concept.

Participants in the course will benefit from interacting with special collections material, visiting off-site institutions, and hearing from industry professionals who have a hand in making or selecting the books that become Pop Bibliography.

Course Information

Instructor: Jesse R. Erickson, Ph.D., MLIS
Location: Los Angeles, California
Mode: In-person
Dates: August 12–16, 2024
Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

Descriptive bibliography, analytical bibliography, and textual criticism have long been a part of the methods by which literary historians have traced the bibliographical genealogies of textual transmission for a given title or body of work. However, once retooled toward a more expansive and inclusive perspective, bibliography can be implemented in ways that can contribute to deeper understandings of Black print culture. For Black Americans in particular, bibliography has been a pathway to establishing selfhood and fostering a rich intellectual and literary tradition of resistance. Looking at the history of Black American writers, poets, scholars, publishers, and printers from a viewpoint of material culture, this course will apply bibliographical methods to the analysis of Black print culture. From Jupiter Hammon to the Street lit of today, from yesterday’s ephemera to today’s typefaces, we will begin to explore the various ways in which books and periodicals have been both racialized and racially gendered in their material facets.

Course Information

Instructor: Kevin Royal Johnson and Erin McGuirl

Location: Los Angeles

Mode: In-person

Dates: August 5–9, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

What kind of text is a screenplay? How were they made, and by whom? How did their form and function change over time? In this course, students will explore these questions by learning about the history, development, and bibliographical identification of the American film script, from the Silent era to the end of the twentieth century.  

Screenplays are guides to the creation of another work of art: a motion picture. Students enrolled in The Celluloid Paper Trail will learn to see scripts as “blueprints” for films and to identify the material cues that tell how they fit into the larger filmmaking process, revealing the contributions of both credited and silent participants in their creation. The course will teach students to complete a full bibliographical analysis of the film script and identify common office duplication methods. Working from their analyses of the scripts themselves, students will finally experiment with incorporating material evidence into critical arguments about the history of film and production studies, with a focus on queer and feminist bibliography and the history of women in film. 

Librarians, archivists, graduate students, faculty, and rare book dealers are encouraged to take the course. This course is intended for anyone interested in deepening their knowledge of screenplays as material artifacts of film production: if you work with screenplays and/or cinematic archives, this course is for you. It will also be of interest to individuals who study or work with non-letterpress material texts and twentieth century archival collections, and to booksellers, curators, and librarians whose institutions sell or acquire (or may in the future) cinematic archives and screenplays. 

Hands-on exercises using archival film scripts will be an integral part of the course, and the week will include field trips to the Margaret Herrick AMPAS Library. Participants are asked to bring a laptop for daily use in course exercises.

Course Information

Instructor: Inge Bruggeman and Ruth Rogers

Location: Berkeley, California

Mode: In-person

Dates: July 15–18, 2024

Tuition: $975.00

Description

Creation and distribution of the contemporary artist book is flourishing on a global scale. From a vast range of media and subject matter, how does one develop the critical insights needed to maintain or build a collection of contemporary artists’ books? This course will explore creative approaches to harness the visual and communicative power of artists’ books, by integrating them into broader curricular objectives.

Class sessions will be held in local research collections where we will meet with librarians and faculty who acquire and teach with artists’ books. Additional programming will include guided hands-on analysis of selected books, with an emphasis on refining curatorial skills. We will share strategies for identifying artists’ books that fit into a cross-disciplinary educational mission, and how they relate to existing historical collections. Issues of content, production, access, collaboration, and course support will be covered. Guest speakers, specific venues, and readings are forthcoming. 

Course Information

Instructors: John Garcia

Location: Los Angeles

Format: In-person

Dates: August 12–16, 2024

Tuition: $1200

Description

This seminar provides the foundations for a critical analysis of “the book” in American society and culture, from the arrival of moveable type in North America to the immense world of nineteenth-century print culture. We will examine and discuss the varied ways that books and related print artifacts both influenced, and were influenced by, politics, commerce, technology, religion, and literary and popular culture. The course centers the experiences and voices of groups that struggled to find their way into print, especially Indigenous peoples and African Americans. Likewise, participants will learn how marginalized groups were always present in the material practices of early American printing, illustrating, papermaking, binding, and bookselling. Geographical coverage extends beyond the territories that became the United States to include the Caribbean, the Pacific, and portions of Latin America. Hands-on sessions with primary sources will explore ways that bibliographical analysis lends itself to richer interpretations of American history and culture. We will also give time to collecting Americana and discuss how collections reflect changing interests in American history and culture. While the seminar is offered in-person at UCLA, participants will be exposed to the rich collections of the American Antiquarian Society, the nation’s largest and most accessible collection of early American print culture. Scholars, librarians, collectors, and members of the antiquarian book trade are all encouraged to apply to the course.

Course Information

Instructor: Jeremy Abbott

Location: Online

Mode: Online

Dates: August 5–9, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the historical and legal origins of copyright in the United States (along with some relevant international contributions), how that history has influenced library, archive, and special collections practice, and what copyright means now. Through a mix of case law, case studies, and guest speakers, participants will learn the theory and day-to-day application of copyright, share best practices, and collectively try to wrap our heads around its many contradictions. No law degrees or previous exposure to copyright beyond recognizing this “©” are necessary.


 

Course Information

Instructor: Eira Tansey

Location: Online

Mode: Online

Dates: August 5 – August 9, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

Climate change is one of the greatest contemporary threats to archives. Increasingly severe disasters like hurricanes, floods, storms, and wildfires pose immediate dangers. Longer-term trends such as migration and rising sea levels may necessitate decisions concerning the geographic relocation of archives. Archivists and cultural heritage professionals, regardless of where they are located, should understand the threats related to climate change and how it impacts our work and cultural heritage institutions.    
Participants in this course will: 

  1. Learn about the basic science behind climate change  
  2. Explore political governance challenges related to mitigation and adaptation
  3. Develop personalized strategies for addressing climate grief and anxiety
  4. Assess how climate change impacts their local region and institutions
  5. Explore how climate change impacts archives and cultural heritage institutions, both in the short and long-term
  6. Develop skills in using simple climate change data visualization and mapping tools

This week-long course will take place online between 10 AM and 3:30 PM Eastern. Participants will be expected to participate in an online class environment for two hours in the morning and two hours in the afternoon each day of the course. The course will involve a mix of asynchronous readings, live lectures, class discussions, and workshops using web-based climate change data visualization and mapping tools. Although the course focus is on archives, all information and cultural heritage workers are welcome. 

Course Information 

Instructor: Kate Ozment

Location: Los Angeles

Mode: In-person

Dates: August 5 – August 9, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

Critical book history and bibliography explores the intersections of critical theory and bibliographical and book historical scholarship to interrogate the book, the library, and the book historian as nexuses of power. The course will include key readings from feminist bibliography, Black bibliography, Indigenous textualities, and postcolonial book history scholarship to explore their discursive intersections and capabilities as practical methodologies for examining physical objects and interrogating bibliographical norms. Participants will work individually and collectively to engage the “canon” of book history practices and repurpose its critical methods in their scholarship and pedagogy.


Course Information

Instructor: Gwendolyn Collaço

Location: Los Angeles

Mode: In-person

Dates: August 12–16, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

This course provides broad historical overview of Islamic manuscript and print culture, featuring sessions on the historical background and material context of manuscript production, the rise of typographic print and lithography in the Middle East and South Asia, as well as a critical view of 19th-century colonial collecting practices and the formation and conceptualization of ‘special collections’ in Western institutions today vis-à-vis the Islamic world.

The course will open by setting the historical context of Islamic manuscript production, from early Quran manuscripts in the 7th-9th centuries, starting with the rise and development of Arabic script and also examined other forms of early written production, such as Arabic block printing from the 9th century CE, to both decenter the focus on the birth of printing in Europe and also to explore the phenomenon of the co-existence of print techniques and large-scale scribal manuscript production in Islamic societies, a theme which recurs in the 18th-19th century. To provide the wider context of manuscript culture and production, students will also be introduced to the history of the formation of manuscript libraries in the Islamic world and the role they played in premodern knowledge production.

Students will be introduced to the development of Islamic courtly manuscript culture in the early modern period and the flourishing of manuscript illumination and figural illustration, as well as receive an overview of how to describe and date Islamic manuscript bindings, papers, locate colophons, seals and inscriptions, which often have a close connection to the historical libraries and courts foregrounded in the course.  After a thorough exploration of manuscript production, we will turn to the rise of print in the Muslim context in the Middle East and South Asia, exploring the first experiment in typography and the role of missionary presses, then moving on to examine the technology of lithography and how it facilitated a transition from manuscript to large-scale production in the nineteenth century, with particular attention to India and Iran.  The course will conclude with a discussion of colonial histories of collecting in the Middle East and South Asia, and an overview of the European and North American repositories that house large Islamic manuscript, lithograph and rare printed book collections and examine the history and provenance of a selection of these collections with an eye to providing a critical account of the history of collecting.

Course Information

Instructor: Jake Nadal

Location: Online

Mode: Online

Dates: August 12–16, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

Preservation is fundamental to the conceptual mission of libraries, archives, museums, and other collecting institutions. In practice, though, the value proposition of acting on behalf of future generations has trouble competing with the myriad of other goals and requirements these institutions face. This course will survey the current state of practice in preservation and conservation, explore the distinctive present-tense value that these professional capabilities provide, and look in-depth at how these crucial mission functions can be successfully integrated into the real-life operations of collecting institutions. Case studies will include reflect on collections and institutions of different types and sizes and explore how to make the business case and the mission statement work together. The course will highlight the ways that preservation adds value through both perpetuating the collections and serving as a gateway to topics that are present-tense concerns for collecting institutions. Examples include STEM education, equity and inclusion efforts, cultural diplomacy, fundraising and development, and sustainability. Participants in the course will gain an up-to-date understanding of preservation methods and current knowledge about heritage materials, and ideas for how collections care can integrate with and amplify the value of their institutions mission and goals. 

Course Information

Instructors: Gawain Weaver

Location: Los Angeles

Dates: August 12–16, 2024

Tuition: $1325 ($1200 tuition + $125 in laboratory fees)

Course Description

This 5-day workshop is an introduction to the history, identification, and preservation of photographic materials. Participants will acquire hands-on identification skills and learn the essential principles of photograph preservation. Using handheld 60x microscopes and a large set of photographic and photomechanical samples, they will learn how a variety of processes were created, why they look the way they do, and how they deteriorate. Knowledge about photographic processes is essential to their preservation and a better appreciation of the aesthetics and history of photographic prints. The workshop will also include a visit to ___ Library and a lab session in which each student will make their own salted paper print.

Preservation topics include enclosures, handling guidelines, environmental monitoring, the effects of temperature and relative humidity on collections, and the importance of cold storage for certain photographic materials.

Processes examined in detail include but are not limited to the following: daguerreotype, albumen, collodion and gelatin printing-out processes (POP), matte collodion, gelatin silver, photogravure, offset litho, letterpress halftone, collotype, chromogenic color, inkjet, and dye sublimation. Group ID sessions, using a digital microscope and screen projection, will allow participants to practice their identification skills in a guided setting,

A workshop notebook is provided for every participant. The Basic Photographic Sample Set, consisting of 18 identified photographic and photomechanical processes, are available on-site for $125. This sample set is intended for reference and further study and is not used during the workshop.


Course Information

Instructor: Michaela Ullmann
Location: UCLA / Los Angeles
Mode: In-person
Dates: August 5–9, 2024
Tuition: $1200.00
 

Course Description

Colleges, universities, public schools, community archives, and special libraries all over the U.S. have successfully introduced immersive, integrative, collaborative, and active-learning elements into primary source literacy instruction over the past decade. In partnership with teaching faculty, librarians and archivists now play an active role in designing pedagogy featuring in-class activities that teach students archival literacy, information literacy skills, critical thinking skills, and paleography, among other skills for the 21st century student. This course will focus on developing, integrating, teaching, administering and advocating for robust primary source literacy instruction. 

On top of this, Critical Pedagogy and Critical Librarianship (#critlib) has become an integral part of both rare materials theory and praxis. As such, this course will also weave in some of the theories and methods of critical pedagogy. The course will discuss readings that underpin the theories of this movement, and the implementation of the practice of these theories within library environments, classrooms, and community spaces. 

Throughout the course, we will also discuss pedagogy and tools for integrating digital projects as well as asynchronous teaching modules into primary source literacy instruction. 

Using case study projects, participants will gain a sense of how rare book and archives repositories have partnered with faculty in innovative ways. Guest speakers will broaden our conversations, focusing on how librarians can best support their instructional efforts. Class participants will be asked to bring along instructional examples from their home institutions to workshop in a group setting, or if they are not yet in the profession, to imagine a project that would involve faculty collaboration in some substantive way. 

This course is designed to be collaborative in nature and a venue for generating new ideas and to imagine solutions to often-encountered problems in public services and instructional outreach.
This course is best suited for individuals who just start out with primary source literacy instruction and those who have been teaching classes in Special Collections for a while but who seek a deeper dive into pedagogies that make their instruction more engaging and student-centered, who are interested to learn about new lesson plans, and who want help with managing their instruction workload in a sustainable way. 

Components of the syllabus for the course include: 

  • Infrastructure & General Management for building and sustaining a successful instruction program 
  • Introduction to Special Collections and Critical Pedagogy 
  • Discussion of critical theory and praxis models 
  • Establishing meaningful collaboration with librarians, archivists, and teaching faculty 
  • Introduction to Curriculum Mapping and syllabus planning 
  • Overview of useful tools for instruction and their application 
  • Overview & introduction of select digital scholarship tools 
  • Best practices and standards (including RBMS and ALA) 
  • Establishment & assessment of learning outcomes 
  • Field trips 
  • Guest Speakers from the field of Primary Source Literacy and Critical Librarianship 
  • Panel of instructors who teach courses with embedded primary source literacy 

In order to reduce “lecture” time and to create a more vibrant learning environment, the course will feature frequent breaks, flipped classroom, and workshopping during which participants will work on projects by themselves and/or in groups and return to the classroom for discussions and/or presentations.
 

Learning Outcomes

Participants will 

  • Be able to define and implement the basics for a well-functioning instruction program for primary sources literacy; 
  • Understand & apply key terms, concepts, models, and theories related to the critical pedagogy, including how critical approaches intersect with professional functions, including outreach and instruction; 
  • Understand the key role libraries play in supporting diversity throughout society; 
  • Have experienced hands on some of the techniques used to make teaching primary source literacy effective and successful 
  • Leave the course with an understanding, the tools, and the confidence to transform their instructional approach while creating less work for themselves; 
  • Gain a better understanding of the partnership between teaching faculty and Special Collections librarian or archivist and the roles each plays in it; 
  • Gain a basic foundation in digital initiatives that use primary source materials and with selected basic tools they can use to teach primary sources literacy in the digital arena; 
  • Workshop individual projects to implement at their home institutions. 


Información del curso

Instructor: Guillermo Morales

Location: Ciudad de México

Mode: Tenga en cuenta: la instrucción será en español y en persona.

Dates: August 19–23, 2024

Tuition: $1200.00 USD

Descripción del curso

México cuenta con una rica herencia bibliográfica, producto de una amplia actividad editorial, comercial, cultural y académica que data incluso desde el siglo XVI, impulsada tanto por la instalación de la primera imprenta en el continente (1539), como por la fundación de la primera universidad americana (1551) y la apertura de múltiples bibliotecas conventuales. Prueba de esto son las grandes colecciones de libros antiguos conservadas en recintos como la Biblioteca Nacional de México (CdMx), la Biblioteca Palafoxiana (Puebla) o la Biblioteca Francisco de Burgoa (Oaxaca), por mencionar algunos. Estas obras representan una parte del patrimonio bibliográfico que refleja la historia del libro y la cultura escrita en México y son una valiosa fuente de estudio para diversas disciplinas que requieren de especialistas en el constante trabajo de su rescate, valoración y divulgación.

Dirigido a estudiantes universitarios y de posgrado, bibliotecarios, editores y coleccionistas del libro con intereses en Historia del libro, Bibliografía y Patrimonio Documental (cualquier formación profesional –o experiencia– contribuye al debate). Este programa ofrece una mirada al libro antiguo en México desde su introducción hasta el final de la imprenta de tipos móviles, atendiendo los principales actores de la imprenta, el comercio del libro y la instalación de bibliotecas novohispanas. Durante el curso se explicarán también los procesos de manufactura más comunes para los libros impresos de los siglos XVI al XVIII y se abordará de manera sincrónica la problemática actual del rescate de estos documentos con ejercicios sencillos de traducción de portadas latinas, datación de libros sine notis y visitas guiadas a bibliotecas históricas mexicanas.

Course Information

Instructor: Marshall Weber
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Mode: In-person
Dates: August 19–23, 2024
Tuition: $1200.00

Course Description

This is five-day, 6 hour a day workshop on-site at Booklyn, Inc., 140 58th St., Building B, 7-G, Brooklyn  

Making the assumption that most librarians are already activists, this workshop will collectively explore methods to catalyze and/or meet public and student demands for current materials that model activist, creative, non-violent, direct action and political organizing methods. This complex pedagogical proposition will frame the class’s examination of the use of creative materials across disciplines especially those that address the topics of climate change, decolonization, economic inequity, and the resistance to the normalization and perpetuation of genocide, mass incarceration, gun and sexual violence.  

For four days the class will focus on topics that will be illuminated with materials from Booklyn’s collections of archives, artists’ books, ephemera, and zines. On the third the class day will be spent at the Interference Archive at 314 7th St, Brooklyn, NY 11215. 

Day 1, part a. If every home is on fire, then we are all firefighters. 

Introductions and a conversation about the concepts of activism and ‘passivism’ within the context of global events, librarianship and pedagogy.  

Day 1, part b. Artists’ Books to the Front 

Artists’ books are useful and effective aesthetic, emotional, and intellectual tools with which to introduce and engage students in both complex subjects and activism. We’ll look at some important artists’ books that have been used in numerous instruction settings and as primary research material across disciplines.  

Day 2, Prioritizing the collection and dissemination of current political ephemera. 

Street protests, independent print media, and social media campaigns form a crucial and intersecting part of activist strategies. These social movements are often directed by students and youth, so how do we honor and support and assist youth movements in honing their skills in order to make their campaigns more impactful? These campaigns also produce both digital and physical material that need to be both collected and conserved. We’ll also explore how every academic and public library can be a depository and programming space for local organizing, educational, political and protest materials. 

Day 3, Community Archives, living archives, and activist archives 

We’ll look at different ways to use contemporary archives in the classroom, library and in other research and exhibition spaces, as well as partnering with local, national and international groups and organizations on archival preservation and access. We’ll consider examples of how we can or have activated our own academic, personal, and professional networks to take on public stances on social issues or to provide mutual aid to our communities. 

This class will be held at the Interference Archive in Brooklyn, 314 7th St, Brooklyn, NY 11215. 

Day 4, Zines and artists publications 

We’ll start with an anarchist critique about the institutional appropriation of the communal and communitarian origins of zines and continue to explore ways in which community centered publications can be effective educational, empowerment, and organizing tools. We’ll also discuss how every library can also be a zine access and publication center. We’ll look at a lot of zines, please bring in your favorites if you like. 

Day 5, Artists’ Books to the Front Again! 

We’ll do an overview and evaluation of the class, share our resources, and our ideas of how to move forward and look at a very diverse selection of artists’ books and ephemera that will support (and expand upon) the concepts explored in the previous four days. 

Are you an established expert in rare books, special collections, and print culture? Or perhaps an expert in library and information studies, critical librarianship, or data studies? CalRBS encourages course proposals on innovative topics that build on its vast array of courses focusing on rare books, special collections, and manuscripts.


CalRBS is especially interested in the following areas as they relate to rare books, galleries, libraries, archives, and museums:

  • Grant Writing
  • Advanced Pedagogy and Teaching
  • Remote Course Programming and Design
  • Space Planning and Innovative Alternatives
  • Social Media
  • Programming for ESL and Bilingual Constituencies
  • Data Preservation
  • Digital Knowledge Repatriation
  • Crisis Recordkeeping
  • Public Libraries and At-Risk Populations
  • Sustainability Studies
  • Climate Change Impacts on the Profession
  • Grassroots Communities
  • Archives Organization
  • Reappraisal and De-Accessioning
  • Digital Methods for Research and Scholarship
  • Data Activism
  • Collection Development for Specific Communities
  • Ink and Papermaking (Maker studio and/or history of)
  • Children and Young Adults and Public Libraries
  • Primary sources in K-12 Education
  • History, production, and publishing of children’s books
  • Material, Collections, and Institutions through Indigenous and First Nation lenses
  • International Librarianship, Bibliography, and Rare Books
  • Disability Studies
  • Feminist and Gender Studies
  • Postcolonial, Decolonial and Critical Development studies
  • History of small presses and independent publishing in Los Angeles/California/U.S. and beyond
  • Gastronomy, cook books, and food culture
  • Topic and survey courses that focus on undergraduate and high school students

Courses that focus on critical analysis, diversity, ethics, and promote justice-oriented approaches are especially welcome. In addition to these areas, we are looking for courses that fill identified gaps in the current CalRBS curriculum. While new courses can extend beyond the domain of rare books and special collections, they should contextualize rare books within a larger library and information economy, emphasizing the importance of book and print culture throughout the discipline of Information Studies.

California Rare Book School